anna

There's reason to believe maybe this year will be bettter than the last

by anna at 10:20 AM on December 31, 2005

This decade began with a massive worldwide celebration of the New Millennium. Only problem was that it was a year too early. See, time geeks insist that there was no year 0. So 1000 years was up as of 12/31/01. Some of them staged their own goofy celebration featuring fruit punch and charades. Others insist it was like 13 years too late. Seems some years got lost in those early Gregorian calendar years or something.

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comments (9)

anna

It's not a question but a lesson learned in time

by anna at 02:24 PM on December 29, 2005

Like Scientology, Kabala is a celeb-friendly, feel-good religion. Madonna and others are way into it. Some have called it Jewishness without all that pesky guilt and nagging. Jewishness without guilt and nagging is like Mariah Carey in a burqa; or Boy George without his trademark makeup.

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comments (4)

mg

never thought i'd see you naked : Princess Diaries Anne Hathaway

by mg at 09:46 AM on December 28, 2005

I’m not living on one of the coasts anymore so forgive me if I may be a little behind on pop-cultural phenomena, but I was reading this article recently about all the hullabaloo about Brokeback Mountain. It was a straight guys guide to the movie, and talked about how watching the gay cowboy movie wont make you one too.

"Phew," I thought.

I’ve liked Jake Gyllenhaal ever since Donnie Darko, Brokeback does look like an interesting movie and I like to have water cooler conversation, but I was a bit leery because it is one of my greatest fears that I might somehow become a, you know, cowboy.

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comments (23)

anna

Another year, another beer

by anna at 10:06 AM on December 26, 2005

Here it is the day after Christmas. Since the big day fell on a Sunday, today is kind of like an unoffical holiday. Nobody has to work. We're all waking up and realizing that we have new things in our possession.

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comments (3)

chris

Factored in the...never mind

by chris at 01:28 AM on December 26, 2005

Annabelle Chong is a porn star who cuts herself to know that she still feels. Self realization through self mutilation has become a modern way of life for many Americans. It's true for me as well. At least that's how I feel when I watch Bill O'Reilly. It feels like a form of intellectual self mutilation. I don't know why I do it, but sometimes I have to turn on the TV just to remind myself what it feels like not to think.

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comments (11)

anna

Man thinks, since he rules the Earth, he can do as he pleases

by anna at 09:24 AM on December 17, 2005

A recent poll showed that men approve of visible panty lines by a margin of 2-1. By contrast, women disapproved of VPL by the same margin. Now the results aren't all that astounding. But the fact that the poll got conducted in the first place is. Do we really live in a world where one man is hunkered down in a Bradley Fighting Vehicle, rumbling down a perilous road pockmarked with holes from roadside explosions, while another concerns himself with VPL approval ratings?

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comments (25)

chris

death is forever

by chris at 05:40 AM on December 13, 2005

I feel dirty. The people of the state of California put someone to death last night. It says a lot about our society when we make a conscious decision to kill someone. It's freakish to sit and listen to a panel of adult witnesses describe the details of an execution just minutes after it happened. The difficulty getting the needles in. The way the prisoner lifted his head to see his supporters on the other side of the glass, and mouth simple phrases of love and support back and forth. The way the guard kept his hand on the prisoner's upper arm during the preparation of the intravenous lines, not out of necessity, but out of a sense of comfort to a person who is about to be killed.

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comments (24)

anna

All I've got is a photograph

by anna at 08:33 AM on December 11, 2005

All we hear about sometimes is how China and Vietnam and Korea have become such high-tech industrialized juggernauts. No more plows being drawn by tired-looking oxen or women taking a break from their ricy paddy toil to birth twins. And yet, whenever the tiresome subject of bird flu comes up on the news they show the same grainy-looking footage of what appears to be roosters milling aimlessly about, pecking at the ground. The video quality is on a par with 80s sitcom reruns or old NFL films. There are, to use techno jargon, too few pixels per sqare inch. It's the antithesis of high def TV.

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comments (10)

adam

Merry Nothing

by adam at 12:22 AM on December 11, 2005

If I hear or read one more story about the so-called War on Christmas I ... well, I won't do anything, because I'm basically not a violent person. But I'm tired of this nonsense. I'm trying to think of a way to respond to the charge that Christians are persecuted in the United States, but I can't come up with anything that makes sense. The president, the veep, almost all of the major officeholders in the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government, along with better than 80% of the population, are self-identified Christians of one stripe or another. No one is persecuting Christians. What is happening, in a very small way, is that non-Christians are finally insisting that their tax dollars not be used for blatantly religions purposes. Do whatever you want at home, at church, on the street, but when you insist on bringing your religion into City Hall then you're stepping on my toes.

How can I explain how I feel when someone wishes me a "Merry Christmas"? There is no rejoinder I could use as an example - I get the distinct impression that Christians think it's cute when I wish them a "Happy Hanukah". There is no equivalent in the modern Christian world to the crimes that were wreaked upon my people in the name of the Christian god. "Merry Christmas" tells me that I should be happy at the creation of a belief system that has caused my family suffering for uncounted generations. If you think that sparing me that by using "Happy Holidays" is too much to bear, then for all of your complaints of discrimination you don't actually have a clue what it feels like.

comments (25)

anna

They will never forget you till somebody new comes along

by anna at 08:45 AM on December 09, 2005

It is a huge, vastly unproductive industry. At least a dozen magazines and countless TV shows are devoted to every minute detail of the lives and work of at most 30 people. These people earn their livings reading lines written by other people or singing songs other people wrote. Yes, it's the culture of celebrity. First you get to know them by their first names. Then they shorten them to nicknames. Brit, Jess, Jen. When they couple the names morph into some hideous two-headed beast of myth. The Bennifer. The Brangelina. Bah!

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comments (9)

mg

i ought to say no, no, no, sir - mind if I move a little closer?

by mg at 11:40 PM on December 08, 2005

Most people would describe me as a pretty easy-going kind of guy. This is probably large due to the fact that I’m really a pretty easy-going kind of guy. Which makes it safe to say that if I admit to hating something, I really do despise it with a rare passion.

Because of this, there are very few things that I will actually admit to hating. Some of those things include: mean people, women in flannel pajamas, Belgians, smooth jazz, and cold weather.

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comments (8)

adam

A World of Poop?

by adam at 01:05 AM on December 08, 2005

I read this on BoingBoing, and it got me thinking about the depth of government responsibility in our society. We don't live in a socialist country. While we may have an agency devoted to disaster management, the government has zero actual obligation to help anyone when fires, earthquakes, or natural disasters hit. Nor, I should point out, does the government have an obligation to bail out corporations when they're threatened with extinction because of competition, circumstance, or their own incompetence. Under our system, it is up to the people themselves to either put money by or buy insurance to protect themselves from this kind of thing, and if they don't or can't then private citizens should feel free to help them, but the government should not.

I'm not saying this is fair or right. I'm something of a moderate socialist myself, so I believe that the government can have a positive role to play in helping people get on their feet and in equalizing what looks like a bigger gulf between rich and poor than ever. But that's not our government, not the one that we've had since the New Deal and not the one that we have now. If you believe the government should do more to help the victims of Katrina then you don't believe in laissez faire, and that's just fine by me. But that also entails a big change in the way we think about our relationship with the government; our current system, with its various Band-Aids to help the poor and victimized, isn't up to the task.

comments (6)

anna

This is where we used to live

by anna at 10:18 AM on December 03, 2005

Clumsy me. I dropped John Updike's Memoirs of the Ford Administration in the tub. I was only halfway through it. Since the book is 13 years old and yellowed, this pretty much rendered it unreadable. Oh well, I know how it turns out. All his books are the same. I never buy them, I just pilfer them from my father-in-law's extensive collection.

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comments (11)